childhood
Breaking news: On the *Notable* Bea Chang and the river her father promised.

Breaking news: On the *Notable* Bea Chang and the river her father promised.

“They were river boys, he likes to say, and they grew up into mountain men. In college, they sneaked past anti-Communist guardposts by the pale gray of dawn to backpack into the mountain range that stretches down the heart of Taiwan.”   We’re pleased to see that Bea Chang’s “The River My Father Promised” has...
From Our Pages: "Dale Flynn's Blood," memoir by D. J. Lee.

From Our Pages: “Dale Flynn’s Blood,” memoir by D. J. Lee.

Trouble next door. “I pushed away and we stood in the soft wet dirt of the shoulder, staring at one another. Suddenly, he lunged forward …”   D. J. Lee’s searing memoir of bullying, aspiration, and teenaged hormones appeared in BROAD STREET’s “Bedeviled” issue in winter/spring 2015. It has been praised for its gritty portrayal of anger...
"My Internship at Tiffany's," by Julie Anderson--featured at "Writers on the Job."

“My Internship at Tiffany’s,” by Julie Anderson–featured at “Writers on the Job.”

“Who were these elegant ladies who brushed past me, perusing the display cases as casually as if they were shopping for dinner? At Christmas-time, these women wore fur coats and heels and somehow they just looked like money. My mother was beautiful, too, but even as a small child, I could tell the difference between her fake...
From Our Pages:  "Leaving the House," by Kat Meads.

From Our Pages: “Leaving the House,” by Kat Meads.

“Classifications matter. Memory, by nature, is rebellious…” … and so is Kat Meads’s narrator as she looks at the family house she and her brother are abandoning.  Read Kat’s Pushcart-nominated lyrical essay from our “Maps & Legends” issue here, with artwork by Masa Inoue, or enjoy the large-print version below.  Then visit with the author...
Weekend Reading:  "Dancing in Their Heads," on The Nutcracker and the production of girlhood

Weekend Reading: “Dancing in Their Heads,” on The Nutcracker and the production of girlhood

  By Greg Weatherford. * Most of the ballerinas are girls between the ages of ten and thirteen. These are, to put it gently, not easy years to be a girl. They’re growing, or not, they’re getting gangly or getting bulky, they’re getting figures, or not. They’re on the cusp of everything. So life lessons can come...