creativity
Now LIVE: our new issue, "Birth, School, Work, Death."

Now LIVE: our new issue, “Birth, School, Work, Death.”

We present our Summer/Fall 2019 issue–“Birth, School, Work, Death” … Four phases of life, with the beauty in the details. If you wish, you can go to the Table of Contents and Contributors’ Notes on Medium here: Contents. The format on Medium is slightly different. Here’s what you’ll find in this issue … All section...
"The Archaeology of Desire": a portfolio by Gale Rothstein.

“The Archaeology of Desire”: a portfolio by Gale Rothstein.

“Where are we? Who is here with us? How big or small are we? Are we awake or dreaming?” This feature is also available, in slightly different format, on Medium. – – Editors’ Note Gale Rothstein’s work embraces dualisms in a conflicted environment: impermanence and reinvention, loss and hope. She unearths, cuts apart, and reassembles...
Contributor News: Harry Kollatz, Jr., publishes a novel.

Contributor News: Harry Kollatz, Jr., publishes a novel.

Harry Kollatz, Jr., who wrote about our former office’s very own block of Broad Street in Richmond, Virginia, has now published his first novel: Carlisle Montgomery. Carlisle is “six-foot-five, redheaded, pigtailed, gap-and-buck-toothed, nine-fingered, guitar-playing,” and thoroughly beguiling as she launches a musical career in the 1990s, somewhere between grunge and Garth Brooks. She is brought to...
"Ghosts of the Walldogs":  What fading advertisements tell us about ourselves.  An essay by Michael Griffith.

“Ghosts of the Walldogs”: What fading advertisements tell us about ourselves. An essay by Michael Griffith.

” The public square could be a riotous free-for-all for those with businesses, events, or ideas to publicize …” A ghost to be identified below. Ghosts of the Walldogs What fading advertisements tell us about ourselves. From our Winter 2019 issue, “Rivals & Players.” By Michael Griffith * These days, when advertisers talk about competing for eyeballs in “the...
From Our Pages: “To Fill a Room with ‘Nobody’” — Sara Talpos puts Emily Dickinson and mitochondria under the microscope.

From Our Pages: “To Fill a Room with ‘Nobody’” — Sara Talpos puts Emily Dickinson and mitochondria under the microscope.

“To Fill a Room with ‘Nobody’” Emily Dickinson and mitochondria go under the microscope in this Pushcart-nominated essay from our “Small Things, Partial Cures” issue of 2018.  “Mitochondria, the tiny products of endosymbiosis, made it possible for Emily Dickinson to write over 1,700 poems and for Charles Darwin to climb 4,000 feet into the Andean...