medicine
Desperate times, new measures: Broad Street's 2020 Blog.

Desperate times, new measures: Broad Street’s 2020 Blog.

  We feel the need to do something. We make masks, we donate money, we protest and demonstrate … and still our spirits yearn for more. Solidarity and fellow-feeling, the companionship of … what we have, which is a computer screen, where most of us are glued all day and night. But there are people...
“We Are Operating Blindly in Much of the Country,” by Leslie Hayes, MD.

“We Are Operating Blindly in Much of the Country,” by Leslie Hayes, MD.

In the first entry in Broad Street‘s new blog about the pandemic, a doctor explains problems in testing for COVID-19.   “Because physicians weren’t able to test these patients, most states missed noticing when the disease started to have community spread.”   https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/testing.html I belong to several groups of health care workers focusing on issues around COVID-19....
“Assisted Hatching,” an essay by Christine Caulfield.

“Assisted Hatching,” an essay by Christine Caulfield.

The complicated quest to conceive. “To be barren was like having leprosy …” Image by Matthew Henry. We used to joke about being barren. Before we started trying to have a baby, when we were just talking about it, my partner and I would see in everything signs that I was barren and laugh. To be barren...
Contributor News: Susann Cokal wins Gemini Magazine Fiction Prize for a story about J. Marion Sims.

Contributor News: Susann Cokal wins Gemini Magazine Fiction Prize for a story about J. Marion Sims.

Susann Cokal, who contributed “Making Friends with Midge” to our first issue–and who serves as Broad Street‘s Editorial Director–won the Gemini Magazine 2019 Fiction Prize for her story “A Spoon Will Catch the Dark Girls’ Pain.” – “A Spoon Will Catch” is a look at the life of J. Marion Sims, often called the Father of Modern...
“Aunt Milwee’s Balm,” a memoir by Chris Carbaugh.

“Aunt Milwee’s Balm,” a memoir by Chris Carbaugh.

A home remedy unites mourners after its maker’s death. “Milwee was certain that her uncle’s formula was a panacea for countless ailments, aches, and pains: ‘Just rub some on and expect a miracle to occur.’” Saint Mary Magdalene with ointment jar. Illuminated manuscript, c. 1470. There was a strange assortment of people observing the funeral of my aunt...