A Devilish Look

A Devilish Look

From “Demons in the Woods,” a portfolio of photographs by John Moser. Todd by Chad Hunt, 1998 All week we will be spotlighting visual artists who appear in our “Bedeviled” issue, which is coming out soon. Today’s images are from photographers John Moser and Chad Hunt.
Issue 2.1 Preview

Issue 2.1 Preview

  Sneak preview of issue 2.1, “Bedeviled.” Our layout is in the final phases! Which means it will be in print soon. More to come! Featuring:  Alan Cheuse Ramsey Hootman Chad Hunt D.J. Lee Lea Marshall Carol Moldaw John Moser Lisa Allen Ortiz Richard Peabody Joshua Poteat Glenn H. Shepard, Jr....
Deborah Jiang-Stein on Her Mother's Prison Addiction

Deborah Jiang-Stein on Her Mother’s Prison Addiction

Prison Baby author and advocate Deborah Jiang-Stein recently discovered something startling about her birth mother’s imprisonment and heroin addiction. Read more in this special feature, exclusively for Broad Street Online.          
Getting Over Writer's Block

Getting Over Writer’s Block

by Carla Dominguez  All writers have likely experienced this dreaded feeling: You’re reaching deep down into the creativity file of your brain, but you can’t find anything. Even while writing this piece I felt  stumped. I started, paused, gave up. I went back to it, only to give up again...
The Writer magazine features Broad Street

The Writer magazine features Broad Street

A dispatch from the Shameless Promotion Department: The March issue of The Writer includes a detailed conversation with Broad Street Editorial Director Susann Cokal about the magazine, its editorial direction and philosophy, and some terrific words about contributors and the upcoming Bedeviled issue. Check it out on newsstands now!
Contemporary Art as Crime - Part 2

Contemporary Art as Crime – Part 2

by Jamal Stone Contemporary art—art from the late 20th century to the present—often challenges preconceptions, stretching the boundaries of what is and is not art. But sometimes, definitions in the art world get too fuzzy—take, for instance, our understanding of art crime. Traditionally, art crime is simply crime committed against art,...
Typhoid Mary and the Public's Right to Health

Typhoid Mary and the Public’s Right to Health

  by Carla Dominguez Earlier this month, it was confirmed that there are more than 100 cases of measles in the United States—the largest outbreak in the post-vaccination era. An urban legend quickly circulated about a single unvaccinated woman who had traveled to Disneyland, spreading the disease. This misinformation fueled the dispute between those who choose to...
Rafil Kroll-Zaidi's "Findings" Offers a New Take on the Facts

Rafil Kroll-Zaidi’s “Findings” Offers a New Take on the Facts

This week’s recommended weekend reading is the latest installment of the “Findings” column, a staple of Harper’s Magazine, originated by Roger Hodge in 2003 during his tenure at that magazine and currently written by editor Rafil Kroll-Zaidi. In this ongoing project, Kroll-Zaidi mines the pages of each month’s issue of the...
Contemporary Art as Crime - Part 1

Contemporary Art as Crime – Part 1

by Jamal Stone Contemporary art—art from the late 20th century to the present—often challenges preconceptions, stretching the boundaries of what is and is not art. But sometimes, definitions in the art world get too fuzzy—take, for instance, our understanding of art crime. Traditionally, art crime is simply crime committed against...
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John Jeremiah Sullivan Explores the World of Massage

John Jeremiah Sullivan Explores the World of Massage

  For this weekend’s read, we’re in a throwback mood and recommending John Jeremiah Sullivan’s 2012 piece for the New York Times Magazine, “My Multiday Massage-a-thon.” In the piece, Sullivan, the author of the 2011 essay collection Pulphead and contributor to publications such as The Paris Review and GQ, first declares himself something of a massage...
Art Imitating Life: Drones Appearing on Afghan Rugs

Art Imitating Life: Drones Appearing on Afghan Rugs

Here at Broad Street we are fascinated with the ways art reflects life—sometimes in surprising forms. The Atlantic recently ran a piece that showcases one such example. Cosimo Bizzari writes about a recent trend taken by Afghan rug-weavers: When it comes to what to depict on rugs, Afghan weavers traditionally turn to what’s most familiar. So in...
The Curious Case of Harper Lee vs. the County School Board

The Curious Case of Harper Lee vs. the County School Board

by Jamal Stone Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird has become a rite of passage for middle- and high-school students for its sensitive approach to mature topics such as racism, rape, and murder. But in 1966 some parents found its subject matter “immoral.” At least that was the reason given when Virginia’s Hanover School Board, then embroiled in the...
Julia Scheeres Documents the Untold Story of Jonestown

Julia Scheeres Documents the Untold Story of Jonestown

This week we recommend the Longreads exclusive excerpt of journalist Julia Scheeres’s New York Times bestselling investigative work, A Thousand Lives: The Untold Story of Jonestown. In this piece, Scheeres follows the story of Tommy Bogue, a troubled teenager who followed his parents from San Francisco to the ill-fated Jonestown compound founded by Jim Jones deep in the Guyana...
The Woman Behind "The Grapes of Wrath"

The Woman Behind “The Grapes of Wrath”

by Carla Dominguez Sanora Babb was a writer, poet, and journalist who spent most of her adult life living in the shadow of John Steinbeck. By a strange twist of fate, the meticulous notes she took during her time visiting migrant workers in the Dust Bowl underpinned two novels: her own, Whose Names Are Unknown, and...