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New Work by Contributor Maggie Messitt
Broad Street Blog / Contributors

New Work by Contributor Maggie Messitt

  Check out new work by Broad Street contributor Maggie Messitt, whose essay “Ukufa” appears in our current issue, Hunt, Gather. In “North 20°54, West 156°14,” newly posted at the Bending Genre blog, Messitt traces the mystery of a disappeared aunt through a series of maps, both real and virtual. Surveying the maps tacked to her … Continue reading

Rediscover the Andy Warhol-Mama Cass Elliot project that never happened
Broad Street Blog

Rediscover the Andy Warhol-Mama Cass Elliot project that never happened

Thanks to Longreads we recently came across this Guardian reprint of a fascinating 1967 piece written by Danny Fields for the now-defunct rock magazine Hullabaloo, outlining a series of encounters between Andy Warhol and singer “Mama” Cass Elliot of The Mamas and the Papas and other seminal acts. In a few fleeting scenes Fields charts the … Continue reading

Octavia Butler and the defiance of genre in “Kindred”
Broad Street Blog

Octavia Butler and the defiance of genre in “Kindred”

by Jamal Stone Kindred, Octavia Butler’s 1979 best-seller, defies genre conventions. It is an intensely emotional novel that blends elements of sci-fi time travel with an antebellum first-person slave narrative. The novel takes African American protagonist Dana back to slave times at seemingly random intervals, leaving her to survive in a cruel world as she tries … Continue reading

Charles D’Ambrosio’s “Documents” charts the fierce, precise language of grief
Broad Street Blog / Culture / History / Musings

Charles D’Ambrosio’s “Documents” charts the fierce, precise language of grief

On the occasion of Pacific Northwest writer Charles D’Ambrosio’s new book of essays, Loitering, slated for November release from Tin House, we’re recommending “Documents,” a piece D’Ambrosio contributed to The New Yorker in 2002, and which is included in Loitering. The essay, a delicate yet devastating memoir in fragments, is partially composed of passages culled … Continue reading

“Barrow, Alaska” photographer wins recognition
Broad Street Blog

“Barrow, Alaska” photographer wins recognition

Congratulations to photographer Dawn Whitmore, whose photo essay on Barrow, Alaska, is a centerpiece of Broad Street’s “Hunt, Gather” issue. Whitmore recently was awarded second place in the 2014 Photo Review Competition, juried by by Jennifer Blessing, senior curator of photography for the Guggenheim Museum of Art. Her winning work will be exhibited at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia from October 31-December 5. … Continue reading

As Halloween looms, we interrogate “Devil’s Advocate”
Broad Street Blog / Culture / Investigation

As Halloween looms, we interrogate “Devil’s Advocate”

From the 1997 film   The facts: Broad Street Magazine’s “Bedeviled” issue draws closer than ever to publication, Halloween is less than a week away, and The Devil’s Advocate recently has been picked up as a TV series by NBC. This raises a question: Rhetorically, a devil’s advocate is someone who argues for argument’s sake, but what exactly … Continue reading

In his Nobel speech, J.M. Coetzee discusses truth and then starts making things up
Broad Street Blog

In his Nobel speech, J.M. Coetzee discusses truth and then starts making things up

At the banquet for his Nobel Prize for literature in 2003, J.M. Coetzee, author of Foe, mused about truth and authorship. He recalled the moment in his childhood where he realized that Robinson Crusoe was not, in fact, written by Robinson Crusoe. Then, rather than delivering the traditional lecture, Coetzee told a strange story in which he claimed … Continue reading

Claudia Roth Pierpont on Nina Simone
Broad Street Blog

Claudia Roth Pierpont on Nina Simone

This week we recommend Claudia Roth Pierpont’s thoughts on the life of Nina Simone, “A Raised Voice,“ over at the currently open archives of The New Yorker. As Roth Pierpont observes, controversy broke out earlier this year over the announcement of the selection of Zoe Saldana, “a movie star of Dominican descent and a light-skinned beauty along … Continue reading

Is this kit really designed to kill vampires?
Broad Street Blog

Is this kit really designed to kill vampires?

Just in time for Halloween, making rounds on the internet again are pictures and videos of 19th-century vampire-hunting kits, boxes packed tight with everything you’d need to kill vampires. Most people who have them acknowledge that their collections are replicas, but some people are sure that they’ve got the real deal. Are these kits part of a … Continue reading

Read this essay by Harrison Candelaria Fletcher at Newfound Journal
Broad Street Blog

Read this essay by Harrison Candelaria Fletcher at Newfound Journal

This week, Broad Street recommends a dreamlike collage essay by Harrison Candelaria Fletcher (whose piece in the “Hunt, Gather” issue recently was called “superb” in a review by New Pages). In “Artifacts,” published in the current issue of Newfound Journal, Fletcher offers an intimate, impressionistic portrait of his mother, who we see in a series of snapshots of … Continue reading