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"The Archaeology of Desire": a portfolio by Gale Rothstein.

“The Archaeology of Desire”: a portfolio by Gale Rothstein.

“Where are we? Who is here with us? How big or small are we? Are we awake or dreaming?” This feature is also available, in slightly different format, on Medium. – – Editors’ Note Gale Rothstein’s work embraces dualisms in a conflicted environment: impermanence and reinvention, loss and hope. She unearths, cuts apart, and reassembles...
"The Art of Living with the Unacceptable," an essay by Miranda Perrone.

“The Art of Living with the Unacceptable,” an essay by Miranda Perrone.

The ballast of civil disobedience … “It is possible to break the law without being disobedient, and to disobediently follow it.” Sixshooter Peaks, Bears Ears National Monument. Bob Wick, U.S. Bureau of Land Management. – This feature is also available, in slightly different format, on Medium. – The Art of Living with the Unacceptable —...
“We Were Working Moms." An essay by Colleen Curran from "Rivals & Players."

“We Were Working Moms.” An essay by Colleen Curran from “Rivals & Players.”

“Then we picked it up again. To begin the elaborate game. Of working motherhood …” Broad Street presents a feature from our Winter/Spring 2019 issue, “Rivals & Players.” Bees and pollen in artificial honeycomb. Photo by Chad Hunt. “We Were Working Moms.” By Colleen Curran We were always running around. Packing school lunches while trying to get dressed for...
Issue 3.2, “Rivals & Players," is LIVE: Sample the Contents here now.

Issue 3.2, “Rivals & Players,” is LIVE: Sample the Contents here now.

Issue 3.2, “Rivals & Players,” is live: Sample the Contents here. Presenting words and images from our Winter 2019 issue--all online and completely free to read. Do we play the game, or does the game play us? What do we see when we spin Fortune’s wheel? Who’s watching, anyway? And when are they coming for us? In...
"Ghosts of the Walldogs":  What fading advertisements tell us about ourselves.  An essay by Michael Griffith.

“Ghosts of the Walldogs”: What fading advertisements tell us about ourselves. An essay by Michael Griffith.

” The public square could be a riotous free-for-all for those with businesses, events, or ideas to publicize …” A ghost to be identified below. Ghosts of the Walldogs What fading advertisements tell us about ourselves. From our Winter 2019 issue, “Rivals & Players.” By Michael Griffith * These days, when advertisers talk about competing for eyeballs in “the...